College…It’s Not for Everyone

Although there are many options after high school, society often pressures students to go to college.

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 College…It’s Not for Everyone

Flags hung up outside guidance office, promoting the different colleges.

Flags hung up outside guidance office, promoting the different colleges.

Sarah Mills

Flags hung up outside guidance office, promoting the different colleges.

Sarah Mills

Sarah Mills

Flags hung up outside guidance office, promoting the different colleges.

Sarah Grace Mills, Reporter

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Students sit all day in schools working, learning, studying, and testing. Why? To prepare for their futures. But what does life after high school look like?

I agree that many students should go to college for their next step. It is a place with great opportunities, and it provides the higher level education that often helps students find success.

However, people have found success in other ways, and college is not necessary for everyone. Students need to find the right path for themselves.

Although a majority of seniors pack their closets at the end of summer and say goodbye to their loved ones, college does not have to be everyone’s path. High school graduates have a choice with what they want to do with their life after high school.

Graduates could travel the world, enter the workforce, go to cosmetology school, learn a trade, enroll in a college/university, or many other choices. The possibilities are endless.

So why are high school students pressured to believe college is the priority after graduation? Society today has moved in a direction that makes people believe they need a college degree to get a decent job. Maybe that’s why so many students enter college, possibly without needing to.

Of the 3.1 million high school graduates ages 16 to 24, 69.7 percent were enrolled in college in 2016.

But that’s not the only option.

Society today has moved in a direction that makes people believe they need a college degree to get a decent job. Maybe that’s why so many students enter college, possibly without needing to.”

DHS graduate Andy Helmer decided to take a year off before heading to college. Gap years, a year-long break in which students travel or work a regular job before focusing on further education, are becoming more popular, allowing students a chance determine what their future interests really are.

“I wanted to take a year off because I wasn’t sure on what I wanted to do, and I didn’t want to waste my time and money,” Helmer said.

Other students choose to enter the military either as a career or  to earn money for college through the GI Bill.

Young adults may gain a greater skill set in their area of interest if they decide to enroll in college, but some technical schools and 2-year degrees can be more useful and cost less money.

The process of choosing the right path can be hard, and students often don’t look into other options because society has led them to believe that college is almost a requirement for success.

Mr. Probert from Dallastown’s Counseling Office has helped many students with future plans.

“It’s a process that can be difficult to navigate because it’s so big; however, there are a lot of good tools to use,” Probert said.

All in all, it’s necessary for some students to go to college. Their future careers require that level of education, but students should feel free to follow their passions, college or not.