Color the World

Dallastown Global Scholars Program sells handmade bracelets to benefit The Pulsera Project.

All+Pulsera+Bracelets+come+with+a+tag+of+the+name+of+the+person+who+made+the+bracelet%2C+and+some+information+about+them.+
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Color the World

All Pulsera Bracelets come with a tag of the name of the person who made the bracelet, and some information about them.

All Pulsera Bracelets come with a tag of the name of the person who made the bracelet, and some information about them.

Emma Fitzgibbons

All Pulsera Bracelets come with a tag of the name of the person who made the bracelet, and some information about them.

Emma Fitzgibbons

Emma Fitzgibbons

All Pulsera Bracelets come with a tag of the name of the person who made the bracelet, and some information about them.

Emma Fitzgibbons, Reporter

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Over the summer, the trend of making homemade bracelets became a part of our day to day life  here at Dallastown. Now students are seen wearing these fun and vibrant bracelets daily, pairing them with scrunchies and other types of bracelets.

While many students make these bracelets themselves, there are also places and opportunities to buy these bracelets with more of a complex and intricate design.

Until February 12, DHS students who are a part of the Global Scholars Program will  sold such bracelets known as the Pulsera Project.

What is the Pulsera Project exactly? The Pulsera Project is a group of people from Latin American countries that make and sell colorful bracelets to help people in Latin American countries. Proceeds from bracelet sales aid organizations such as health care, environmental programs, housing, workers rights and more.

This organization originated from Guatemala, however, it has spread out to many other Latin American countries.

Senora Garrett, leader of the Global Scholars Program says, “We’ve been selling these bracelets for a few years now and it has been a success! Students love buying them and they’re for a great cause.”

Each bracelet has a tag with the name of the person who made it and a little background information about the creator to make the bracelets more personal.

Emma Fitzgibbons
Freshman, Sadie Koicuba, pairs her Pulsera bracelets with her colorful scrunchie.

The name pulsera in Spanish simply translates to bracelet, which is why this project was given the name.

Katie Queenan, a sophomore member of the Global Scholars Club claims,“Everyday I have to get more bracelets from Senora Garrett because I always run out. Some people even ask me to hold bracelets for them to buy the next day.”

Pulsera bracelets were sold for $5 each. The total profit of this year’s sale was not available at the time of publication.For more information about the Pulsera Project, visit the link below.

https://www.pulseraproject.org/