The Transition to Virtual Drive

Students and staff are adjusting to a new drivers’ education program.

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Shelby Hallett

Virtual Drive, though it is not much different, is the new replacement for Wilson’s Driver Training.

Shelby Hallett, Reporter

 

Last year Dallastown Area Highschool made a transition from Wilson’s Drivers’ Training to the new online driving course, Virtual Drive.

Josh Luckenbaugh, the head of the athletics department and Drivers’ Education Administrator, explained, “We’re trying to get the Wilson’s Driving program students completed first, however we are doing our best to make sure drivers are getting their licenses upon their eligability date.  They are just about done but we have about fifteen people left.”

Meanwhile, approximately 150 students have already started signing up for virtual drive.

Luckenbaugh reported that they are getting good feedback but there will always be complaints about the online part of the course, since the course requires thirty hours of work.

I’m still nervous about driving but the class really prepared me for different situations I could get into.”

— Daudelin

Sophomore Daniel Hallett expressed his thoughts on the new drivers’ education course.  “The videos are very helpful but the order we have to watch them in is weird and confusing.  Other than that it’s pretty good.”

Students who took the Wilson’s course last year also reflected on their learning experience.

Senior Nicole Daudeline, who took the Wilson’s Training course as a junior said, “I thought it was a good class to take because it gave me a lot of information. . . it covered everything you need to know.  I’m still nervous about driving but the class really prepared me for different situations I could get into.”

Luckenbaugh explained, “the online course is mandated by the state. . . It’s definitely beneficial to get your permit and your basic knowledge but the behind the wheel is what teaches you how to drive.”

The behind the wheel portion of the test is still part of the curriculum, however, the payment method has changed slightly.

“We broke the cost into two payments. Students pay for the online portion, which is state mandated, first” Luckenbaugh explained.  Students would pay for the instructed driving portion of the course after completing the online part.  

“I’m very happy that we broke the payment into two payments because it helps students and families more with financial concerns.  They don’t pay $360 up front,” Luckenbaugh continued.

Ultimately the course has not changed very much but the updates to the payment process and switch to Virtual Drive have been wonderful improvements so far.

For more information about the process of transitioning to Virtual Drive, check out last year’s article on the subject: “Dallastown Gets New Provider for Online Driving Course.”